What kinds of imitation does Aristotle identify in poetry and tragedy?

Aristotle uses imitation in poetry and tragedy not in humans, but the actions of the humans in their life; their emotions (see link).  Aristotle believes that rhythm tune and meter aren’t used in unison, but rather a rotation. One at a time, but also one right after the other in tragedy.  In poetry, he believes that rhythm, rhyme, and meter are used in unison, but he feels that, in tragedy, they’re used in sequence. (in reading)
The words in poems are chosen specifically for the way they give a “feel” for the item they represent.

Does Aristotle convey a positive sense of the role of imitation in art?

Aristotle does conveys a positive sense of the role of imitation of art.  His sense puts it in a way to where we can connect art to our learning experience of life. He also mentioned something about we are programed to learn, even if the learning is bad for us.  Our experience and emotions connect to what is on a canvas, even if the picture’s residents has nothing to do with us as humans.

Do you think that his understanding of art in terms of imitation provide a useful way to understand what art is?

I do believe that Aristotle’s understanding of art in terms of imitation does provide a useful way to understand what art is.  As said before, connection to an art piece help us understand what the artist has or is going through.  We appreciate the art more if we connect with it.

https://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/a/agamemnon-the-choephori-and-the-eumenides/critical-essay/aristotle-on-tragedy

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s